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Volume 31 (Suppl); December 2020
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Original Articles
Is Nonstandard Employment Hazardous to Workers' Health Status? A Focus on Special Employment in South Korea
Bo Hyun Park, Tarlov Elizabeth, Chang Gi Park
J Korean Acad Community Health Nurs. 2020;31(Suppl):525-533.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12799/jkachn.2020.31.S.525
  • 287 View
  • 7 Download
  • 1 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
Workers in special employment relationship (WSERs) are workers in nonstandard employment arrangements who lack worker protection accorded in standard employment arrangements. This study aimed to describe self-rated health (SRH) and depressive symptoms (DS) among Korean WSERs in comparison to regular wage workers (RWW) and identify associations between working conditions and those outcomes.
Methods
In this study, secondary data analysis using the 5th Korean Working Conditions Survey was used. The sample totaled 29,120, including 1,538 WSERs and 27,564 RWWs. Sociodemographic and work-related characteristics were employed as explanatory variables and SRH and DS as dependent variables. Using multiple logistic regression, the determinants of fair/poor SRH and DS were identified.
Results
The prevalence rates for fair/poor SRH and DS in WSERs were 25.2% and 28.3%, respectively, and 20.7% and 25.0% in RWWs, respectively. Compared to RWWs, WSERs had 31% (aOR=1.31, 95% CI=1.14~1.49) and 20% (aOR=1.20, 95% CI=1.06~1.36) higher odds of SRH and DS, respectively. Some factors, such as a lack of rest guarantee and sickness presenteeism, had a larger influence in the WSER than in the RWW group.
Conclusion
Compared to RWWs, WSERs reported having poorer working conditions and were more likely to report poor general and mental health. Therefore, in Korea, public health policymakers should consider measures to protect the working conditions and health of WSERs, a growing segment of the working population. The study produced new epidemiological evidence regarding the relationships between employment arrangements and health.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Effect of Job Demands, Job Resources, and Musculoskeletal Complaints on Presenteeism Among the Dependent Self-employment Workers in Korea
    Jiyun Kim, Sookja Choi
    Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine.2022; 64(9): 719.     CrossRef
A Comparison of the Prevalence of Cardiovascular Disease and Lifestyle Habits by Disability Status and Type of Disability in Korean Adults: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis
Oh Jong Choi, Seon Young Hwang
J Korean Acad Community Health Nurs. 2020;31(Suppl):534-548.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12799/jkachn.2020.31.S.534
  • 450 View
  • 7 Download
  • 3 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and lifestyle habits of cardiovascular disease (CVD) according to the type of disability in Korean adults compared to adults without disability.
Methods
This study was secondary data analysis using the National Health check-up database from 2010 to 2013. Among the total 395,627 adults aged 30~80, the physically disabled (n=21,614) and the mentally disabled (n=1,448) who met the diagnosis criteria were extracted and compared with non-disabled (n=372,565) through 1:2 propensity score matching for nine characteristics.
Results
Prior to matching, the prevalence of CVD was 34.4% in individuals without disabilities, accounting for 53.8% in those with physical disabilities and 22.4% in those with mental disabilities, showing significant differences between groups (p<.001). After matching, compared to the individuals without disability, those with physically disabled had significantly higher prevalence of CVD and the average number of CVD (p<.001). The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, and vascular disease was significantly higher in the physically disabled (p<.05). Drinking was significantly higher in the non-disabled than in the physically and mentally disabled, and smoking was more in the non-disabled than in the mentally disabled. Physical activity was found to be significantly less in both the physically and mentally disabled than in the non-disabled (p<.01).
Conclusion
It is necessary to confirm the differences in the prevalence of CVD risk factors and lifestyle according to the type of disability, suggesting the development and verification of health promotion programs including physical activity for CVD prevention in the disabled with CVD risk factors.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The delivery of healthy lifestyle interventions for people with disability living in supported accommodation: a scoping review of intervention efficacy and consumer involvement
    Kostas Hatzikiriakidis, Darshini Ayton, Amanda O'Connor, Sarah Carmody, Luke Patitsas, Helen Skouteris, Rachael Green
    Disability and Health Journal.2023; 16(2): 101444.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Sleep Disturbance, Physical Activity, and Health-Related Quality of Life According to Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Secondary Analysis from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Using a Prope
    Jungmi Yun, Yunji Lee
    Healthcare.2023; 11(12): 1802.     CrossRef
  • Association between Light Intensity Physical Activity and All-cause Mortality in Older Adults with Physical Disability
    Inhwan Lee, Hyunsik Kang
    Exercise Science.2022; 31(3): 337.     CrossRef
Multilevel Analysis of Factors Associated with Perceived Good Health and Multimorbidity among Older Adults: Using the 2017 Community Health Survey
Sun Joo Boo, Young Ran Han, Hye Young Choi
J Korean Acad Community Health Nurs. 2020;31(Suppl):549-562.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12799/jkachn.2020.31.S.549
  • 295 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
This study aimed to identify individual- and regional-level factors associated with perceived good health and multimorbidity among older adults.
Methods
Secondary analysis of the 2017 Korea Community Health Survey was conducted on a sample of 67,532 older adults. The individual level data set was combined with regional-level factors from the administrative data released on the Korea National Statistical Office website. Distribution of perceived good health and multimorbidity in 254 public health centers were calculated using sampling weights and presented as percentages. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to identify individual- and regional-level factors associated with perceived good health and multimorbidity.
Results
Overall, 21.1% of subjects perceived their health to be good, ranging from 9.3% to 39.4% by region. The prevalence of multimorbidity was 15.9%, and varied between 6.6% and 22.6% by region. At the individual level, perceived good health was associated with men, younger age, higher educational levels, higher income levels, and those married and living with a partner and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. At the regional level, higher rates of health center personnel among public officials and higher levels of financial independence were associated with perceived good health. Multimorbidity was associated with marital status and healthy lifestyle, and higher rates of health center personnel among public officials.
Conclusion
Regional factors such as health care personnel and local economy could affect population health. Our findings suggest the need to consider individual- and regional-level factors to promote good health among older adults and reduce the health gap by region.
Factors Associated with Physical Activity in Older Adults by Region: Based on the 2017 Community Health Survey
Hyun Ju Lee, Yeong Suk Lee, Jung Mi Yun
J Korean Acad Community Health Nurs. 2020;31(Suppl):563-576.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12799/jkachn.2020.31.S.563
  • 410 View
  • 18 Download
  • 4 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study is to identify personal factors, social factors, and environmental factors related to physical activity in older adults in urban and non-urban areas. Methods: We used source data from the 2017 Community Health Survey. The subjects of this study included some older adults aged 65 and over, and analyzed the data of 23,043 older adults living in the urban and 34,063 older adults living in the non-urban area. Results: The common factors influencing physical activity in older adults by region include current smoking and drinking, BMI, sleep duration, and subjective health status, help with neighbors, frequency of meeting with neighbors and friends, participation in social and leisure activities, and falls experience (p<.001). However, the living environment, public transport satisfaction, and medical service use significantly associated with physical activity for only older adults living in the urban area (p<.001). Conclusion: In order to improve physical activity in older adults in the community, it is necessary to consider not only the improvement of individual factors that practice health behaviors but also health promotion strategies that take into account social and environmental factors because there are environmental differences among regions.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Bridging the Built and Social Environments: A Systematic Review of Studies Investigating Influences on Physical Activity
    Tyler Prochnow, Laurel S. Curran, Christina Amo, Meg S. Patterson
    Journal of Physical Activity and Health.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Symptom profiles and their influencing factors among people with subjective cognitive decline: a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data from the 2019 Korea Community Health Survey using latent class analysis
    Hohyun Seong, Jongmin Park
    BMJ Open.2023; 13(8): e072236.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Physical Activity in Older Adults in South-Eastern Poland
    Agnieszka Wiśniowska-Szurlej, Agnieszka Ćwirlej-Sozańska, Anna Wilmowska-Pietruszyńska, Bernard Sozański
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(24): 16922.     CrossRef
  • Body mass index, subjective body shape, and suicidal ideation among community-dwelling Korean adults
    Chae Eun Yong, Young Bum Kim, Jiyoung Lyu
    Archives of Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
The Relationship between the Prevalence of Suicidal Ideation among Older Adults and Individual · Regional Factors
Young Ran Chin, Chun Mi Kim, Il Su Park, Song Yi Han
J Korean Acad Community Health Nurs. 2020;31(Suppl):577-590.   Published online December 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.12799/jkachn.2020.31.S.577
  • 372 View
  • 7 Download
  • 2 Citations
AbstractAbstract PDF
Purpose
The purpose of this study was to find out the suicidal ideation rate of the elderly including individual and regional factors by sex.
Methods
This is secondary analysis study that combines the data of the 2017 Community Health Survey with the e-indicator data set of the National Statistical Office, and a descriptive correlation study. Statistical analysis used hierarchical logistic regression by SAS 9.4.
Results
The 11.5% of the elderly had suicidal ideation within the last year, and 18.4% in Chungnam is the highest. Individual characteristics include females, older people, lower education levels, no job or housewife, no spouse, less than seven hours of sleep per day on the average, low subjective health, high subjective stress, and the worse their economic conditions, the more they had suicide ideation. Considering regional characteristics, suicidal ideation tended to increase significantly as the number of hospital beds per 1,000 people and the rate of obesity was lower, the rate of stress perception was higher, and the odds value was small. When both individual and regional factors were considered, the model conformity of the suicidal ideation improved (ICC=0.0814).
Conclusion
In order to lower the suicidal rate of the elderly, it seems that both individual and community factors need to be comprehensively approached from the stage of suicidal ideation in the community.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identifying the suicidal ideation risk group among older adults in rural areas: Developing a predictive model using machine learning methods
    Junglyun Kim, DongHyeon Gwak, Seonhee Kim, Moonhee Gang
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2023; 79(2): 641.     CrossRef
  • Factors Related to Suicidal Ideation and Prediction of High-Risk Groups among Youngest-Old Adults in South Korea
    Eungyung Kim, Jee-Seon Yi
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(16): 10028.     CrossRef

RCPHN : Research in Community and Public Health Nursing